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WD-40ed

Information about locks themselves. Questions, tips and lock diagram information should be posted here.

Moderators: zeke79, keysman

WD-40ed

Postby jdudzy » Tue Apr 17, 2012 1:06 am

So I bought this lock on eBay with a removable cylinder. Just got the lock in the mail and it is soaked in a greasy WD-40 type lubricant, it actually makes a gurgling sound when I put the key in. What would be the best way to get this lock back into original condition? I have some dry gun cleaning spray and cleaning patches would that be a good idea?
Thanks!
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby averagejoe » Tue Apr 17, 2012 5:12 am

The easiest (well, best) way would be to take it apart and dry all the pins and springs off. Do not forget to get all of the extra wd40 out of the bible. Rolling up a paper towel, pull it it through and leave it halfway in with the bible up for a while is a good way. If you want to really get them clean then use a non residue cleaner. Reassemble the lock and give it a squirt/puff of any of the recommended lubricants on the forum if needed.

This is usually what I do with all the wd40 soaked locks I get. There have been some that I am amazed the box was not dripping when it got to me :lol:
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby cledry » Tue Apr 17, 2012 5:34 am

Brake cleaner.
Jim
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby jdudzy » Tue Apr 17, 2012 7:22 am

Great thanks I'll give that a try. Also I do not have a cylinder/plug follower for this lot any ways to make a make-shift one so pins don't go flying when I take out the plug. Or should I just take the plug out carefully making sure to keep the pins in correct order.
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby MacGyver101 » Tue Apr 17, 2012 9:45 am

jdudzy wrote:Also I do not have a cylinder/plug follower for this . . .

Plug followers don't need to be fancy. In a pinch I've used hot-glue sticks, cardboard from a sliced-up toilet paper roll, a small permanent marker that happened to be the right size, etc.. I'm sure you have something around that will work.

I'll also echo cledry's suggestion for brake cleaner, or other similar degreaser spray: not a great choice if your padlock has any plastic on the outside that might be damaged... but, if it's all-metal, it should clean things up pretty quickly: I used it on a padlock I received once that was similarly swimming in WD40. (Your mileage may vary, but it worked great for me.) :)
Image
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby globallockytoo » Fri Apr 27, 2012 1:44 pm

drop the whole thing (complete) into a can of paint thinners. This will clean the gunk out of anything. Leave it in there for 3 hours. take it out and drop it into a can of gasoline for an hour. take it out, set fire to it and it will be purged of the greasy crap.
One One was a race horse, one one won one race, one two was a racehorse, one two won one too.

Disclaimer: Do not pull tag off mattress. Not responsible for legal advice while laughing.
Bilock - The Original True Bump Proof Pin Tumbler System!
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby femurat » Fri Apr 27, 2012 3:12 pm

globallockytoo wrote:set fire to it


seriously? :shock:
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby 2octops » Sat Apr 28, 2012 1:19 am

Take it apart and soak it in acetone for a day or so. Air dry and wipe off any residual.
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby cledry » Sat Apr 28, 2012 3:00 am

You guys are making this to complicated, the brake cleaner will flush it out and dry itself in a few seconds, no need to take anything apart.

That said I would rather deal with WD40 than graphite any day. Nothing makes a job messier, except if the maintenance man is also fond of greasing parts that don't need it.
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby rphillips52 » Wed May 02, 2012 2:10 am

My usual choice for lever locks is a water-soluble degreaser (such as Gunk, in the UK), then wash off, and dry with a hair-drier.
For something intricate, such as cylinder locks, white petrol (small tin of lighter fuel is fine) or pure acetone work well. Be careful to avoid 'nail polish remover' - it contains also a grease which will leave a sticky residue. I haven't tried removing the cleaning solvent by burning it but it's probably quicker than using compressed air. If done in a safe place, the amount of fuel is small and flame will not last long, and it will scarcely become hot enough to damage the springs. Compressed air may be bought in aerosol cans from photographic dealers, but drying a lock needs more than just a quick blast, so that comes expensive. If you have a car foot pump, that works well.
Last option for a small intricate lock: whizz it in an ultrasonic cleaning bath. They are not tremendously expensive, but for the odd lock, try asking a watch repairer to do it for you. His fee will see it done quickly, thoroughly, for you with no mess.
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby globallockytoo » Fri May 04, 2012 4:38 pm

cledry wrote:You guys are making this to complicated, the brake cleaner will flush it out and dry itself in a few seconds, no need to take anything apart.

That said I would rather deal with WD40 than graphite any day. Nothing makes a job messier, except if the maintenance man is also fond of greasing parts that don't need it.


yes it might be messier, but it is the cheapest and quickest form of lubrication for metal lock parts. It has been used for many, many years. Many products today are being discovered that uses it's graphene cousin.
Just think the locksmith industry was once on the cutting edge of stuff by using simple powdered graphite. At least it doesnt dry out like wd40. Gotta wash your hands afterward.
One One was a race horse, one one won one race, one two was a racehorse, one two won one too.

Disclaimer: Do not pull tag off mattress. Not responsible for legal advice while laughing.
Bilock - The Original True Bump Proof Pin Tumbler System!
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby cledry » Fri May 04, 2012 7:55 pm

globallockytoo wrote:
cledry wrote:You guys are making this to complicated, the brake cleaner will flush it out and dry itself in a few seconds, no need to take anything apart.

That said I would rather deal with WD40 than graphite any day. Nothing makes a job messier, except if the maintenance man is also fond of greasing parts that don't need it.


yes it might be messier, but it is the cheapest and quickest form of lubrication for metal lock parts. It has been used for many, many years. Many products today are being discovered that uses it's graphene cousin.
Just think the locksmith industry was once on the cutting edge of stuff by using simple powdered graphite. At least it doesnt dry out like wd40. Gotta wash your hands afterward.


It is only quickest if it is incorrectly applied.

I have seen as more locks malfunction from overzealous graphite use than due to the use of WD40. I've seen locks that couldn't have the key inserted fully due to compressed graphite at the back of the plug. WD40 chiefly stops working well and gums things up if the lock is in use infrequently, or one that has sat for a time with no use at all.

Graphite is meant to be used very sparingly only when a lock is completely disassembled and cleaned of existing graphite or other lubricants. It should not be used on locks with stainless steel, pot metal or aluminum parts, although I have never witnessed graphite's supposed corrosive effects personally. Plus graphite won't flush out dirt. There are much better liquid alternatives to graphite these days, including dry film lubricants.

Plus anyone who has removed a door knob in a house with a light carpet only to have a few decades worth of graphite fall on the customer's carpet will never use that stuff again.
Jim
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby mhole » Sat May 05, 2012 1:28 am

Amen - it's amazing how much graphite you can fit into a pair of lever handles, and it's always over a cream carpet...
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby Aldenrenfrid » Sun May 06, 2012 3:26 am

mhole wrote:Amen - it's amazing how much graphite you can fit into a pair of lever handles, and it's always over a cream carpet...

Winces and nods. I shudder to think of those memories and horrified clients... :oops:
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Re: WD-40ed

Postby Raymond » Sun May 06, 2012 1:20 pm

Just for consideration... I have taken off locks just as described and saw a pile of black dust fall out. However, I believe that this is the result of many years of powdered metal dust. After the WD40 evaporates it is "metal on metal" and the swivel point of a knob or lever will begin to grind itself to powder.

As a similar example, look at door and safe hinges that have not been adjusted or lubricated in a long time. There will be a small but noticeable trace of black powder below the hinge. This is the hinge wearing out and not graphite.
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